Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2018  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 387--392

Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of non-typhoid Salmonella in military personnel, 1988-2013


Apichai Srijan1, Woradee Lurchachaiwong1, Boonchai Wongstitwilairoong1, Ladaporn Bodhidatta1, Carl Mason2, Brett Swierczewski1 
1 Department of Enteric Diseases, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangkok, Thailand
2 Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, current affiliation of the Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD, USA

Correspondence Address:
Woradee Lurchachaiwong
Department of Enteric Diseases, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences (USAMD-AFRIMS), Bangkok
Thailand

Objective: To describe the spanning 25 years data for the occurrence, magnitude, and trends regarding antimicrobial resistance of non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) isolated from non-immune travelers to Thailand participating in joint military operations. Methods: A total of 355 NTS isolates, obtained from 2 052 fecal samples from US soldiers deployed for military maneuvers in Thailand during 1988-2013, were examined for NTS serogroup/ serotypes and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by disk diffusion to these 10 antibiotics: ampicillin, azithromycin (AZM), ciprofloxacin, colistin, gentamicin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin (STR), tetracycline (TET), and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Identified AZM-resistant NTS isolates were further evaluated for their minimal inhibitory concentration by the E-test method. Results: NTS infections accounted for 17.3% (355/2 052), including 11 serogroups and 50 different serotypes. The most prevalent serogroup was Salmonella group C2-C3 (35.8%, 127/355) followed by groups B (21.1%, 75/355) and C1 (18.6%, 66/355). Identified serotypes included Salmonella hadar (n=60), Salmonella rissen (n=45), and Salmonella blockley (n=34). Among the predominate serogroups, antimicrobial resistance was consistently high against TET (76.9%, 273/355) followed by STR (40.8%, 145/355). One Salmonella senftenberg isolate demonstrated decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility. Most isolates (94.6%) were resistant to one or more antimicrobials, and the most common multidrug resistance was TET-STR-nalidixic acid (11.5%, 41/355). Conclusions: The prevalence of NTS serotypes and the growing magnitude of antibiotic resistant bacteria isolated from deployed US military in Thailand are documented from 1988-2013. This study demonstrates the antibiotic resistance profiles, highlighting the effectiveness of AZM that is a first-line treatment for travelers to Southeast Asia. AZM-resistant NTS isolates are periodically observed over a 25- year period. Hence, the ongoing surveillance and prevalence efforts are required to monitor NTS resistant strains causing further treatment failure.


How to cite this article:
Srijan A, Lurchachaiwong W, Wongstitwilairoong B, Bodhidatta L, Mason C, Swierczewski B. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of non-typhoid Salmonella in military personnel, 1988-2013.Asian Pac J Trop Med 2018;11:387-392


How to cite this URL:
Srijan A, Lurchachaiwong W, Wongstitwilairoong B, Bodhidatta L, Mason C, Swierczewski B. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of non-typhoid Salmonella in military personnel, 1988-2013. Asian Pac J Trop Med [serial online] 2018 [cited 2021 Apr 13 ];11:387-392
Available from: https://www.apjtm.org/article.asp?issn=1995-7645;year=2018;volume=11;issue=6;spage=387;epage=392;aulast=Srijan;type=0