Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 67--71

Occurrence of Chlamydia spp. in wild birds in Thailand


Suksai Parut1, Onket Rattanaporn2, Wiriyarat Witthawat3, Sangkachai Nareerat1, Lekcharoen Paisin1, Sariya Ladawan1 
1 The Monitoring and Surveillance Center for Zoonotic Diseases in Wildlife and Exotic Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Mahidol University, Salaya, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand
2 Faculty of Veterinary Technology, Kasetsart University, Ngam Wong Wan Road, Lat Yao, Chatuchak, Bangkok, Thailand
3 The Monitoring and Surveillance Center for Zoonotic Diseases in Wildlife and Exotic Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Mahidol University, Salaya; Department of Preclinical Sciences and Applied Animal Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Mahidol University, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand

Correspondence Address:
Sariya Ladawan
The Monitoring and Surveillance Center for Zoonotic Diseases in Wildlife and Exotic Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Mahidol University, Salaya, Nakhon Pathom 73170
Thailand

Objective: To determine the occurrence of Chlamydia spp. in wild birds in Thailand. Methods: Cloacal and tracheal swabs of 313 wild birds from 11 orders, 27 families, and 51 species were tested to determine the occurrence of Chlamydia infection. The outer membrane protein A (ompA) gene was amplified from positive samples to construct a phylogenetic tree. Results: At the time of sample collection, none of the birds showed clinical signs of any disease. Of 313 wild birds, two Asian openbill stork (Anastomus oscitans) were positive for Chlamydia spp., representing 0.64% (2/313) and 4.9% (2/41) occurrence for birds overall and for the Asian openbill stork, respectively. Phylogram analysis based on deduced amino acid of the ompA gene showed that Chlamydia spp. in Asian openbill storks was closely related to that in wildfowl (Pica pica and Cygnus olor) from Poland in a different branch with a 95% bootstrap value and had a shorter evolutionary distance to Chlamydia abortus. Conclusions: Asymptomatic Asian openbill storks could be a potential source of Chlamydia infection in domestic animals, poultry, and humans who share their habitat.


How to cite this article:
Parut S, Rattanaporn O, Witthawat W, Nareerat S, Paisin L, Ladawan S. Occurrence of Chlamydia spp. in wild birds in Thailand.Asian Pac J Trop Med 2019;12:67-71


How to cite this URL:
Parut S, Rattanaporn O, Witthawat W, Nareerat S, Paisin L, Ladawan S. Occurrence of Chlamydia spp. in wild birds in Thailand. Asian Pac J Trop Med [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Mar 26 ];12:67-71
Available from: http://www.apjtm.org/article.asp?issn=1995-7645;year=2019;volume=12;issue=2;spage=67;epage=71;aulast=Parut;type=0