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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 8-16

Prevalence and genotype distribution of hepatitis B virus among migrant workers in Lombok Island, Indonesia


1 Institute of Tropical Disease; Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health; Indonesia-Japan Collaborative Research Center for Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases, Institute of Tropical Disease, Universitas Airlangga, Surabaya, East Java 60115, Indonesia
2 Institute of Tropical Disease, Universitas Airlangga, Surabaya, East Java 60115; Faculty of Medicine, Mataram University, West Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia
3 Institute of Tropical Disease; Indonesia-Japan Collaborative Research Center for Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases, Institute of Tropical Disease, Universitas Airlangga, Surabaya, East Java 60115, Indonesia
4 Institute of Tropical Disease; Indonesia-Japan Collaborative Research Center for Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases, Institute of Tropical Disease; Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Airlangga, Surabaya, East Java 60131, Indonesia
5 Indonesia-Japan Collaborative Research Center for Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases, Institute of Tropical Disease, Universitas Airlangga, Surabaya, East Java 60115, Indonesia; Center for Infectious Diseases, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo 6500017, Japan
6 Institute of Tropical Disease; Indonesia-Japan Collaborative Research Center for Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases, Institute of Tropical Disease; Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Airlangga, Surabaya, East Java 60131, Indonesia
7 Center for Infectious Diseases, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo 6500017, Japan

Correspondence Address:
Maria Inge Lusida
Institute of Tropical Disease; Indonesia-Japan Collaborative Research Center for Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases, Institute of Tropical Disease; Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Airlangga, Surabaya, East Java 60131
Indonesia
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Source of Support: This work was partly supported by the Grant-in-Aid from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (16H05826), and a Grant-in-Aid from the Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Disease (J-GRID) supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. The present study was also supported by Grantin- Aid from Professor Dato’ Sri Tahir through Tahir professorship, Indonesia. We are also grateful to Hepatika Laboratory Mataram for providing serum samples obtained from migrant workers and University of Mataram, School of Medicine, Mataram West Nusa Tenggara, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1995-7645.273568

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Objective: To examine the potential risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) spread in Indonesia by migrant workers, based on the molecular characteristics of HBV strains. Methods: Sera collected from migrant workers traveling to their destination countries (pre-migrant workers) and those returning to Indonesia (post-migrant workers) were screened for HBsAg by ELISA, followed by HBV DNA detection by PCR and (sub) genotype/subtype determination according to surface region and whole genome sequencing. Results: Of 87 pre-migrant workers, 15 (17.24%) were HBsAg-positive, whereas 15 (12.10%) of 124 post-migrant workers were HBsAg seropositive. HBV genotype analysis based on the S region showed that HBV-B3/adw2 was predominant (96.15%, 25/26) whereas 3.85% (1/26) of isolates were HBV-C3/adrq+. Whole genome sequencing of selected strains and phylogenetic tree analysis identified subgenotype B7 in three samples previously categorized as subgenotype B3 based on S region analysis, supporting a recent argument that subgenotypes B5/B7/B8/B9 could be considered as a quasi-subgenotype of B3. Conclusions: A high prevalence of HBsAg carriers was detected among migrant workers from Lombok Island, with no significant difference in prevalence between before and after returning to Indonesia. All strains were classified into genotypes common in Indonesia, and the results suggested that migrant workers are not a risk factor for HBV transmission into Indonesia.


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