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REVIEW
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 313-319

Zoonotic leishmaniasis and control in Ethiopia


Department of Medical Parasitology, School of Biomedical and Laboratory Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences; Tropical Infectious Diseases Research Center (TIDR), University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia

Correspondence Address:
Wossenseged Lemma
Department of Medical Parasitology, School of Biomedical and Laboratory Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar
Ethiopia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1995-7645.233178

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Visceral leishmaniasis and cutaneous leishmaniasis are important public health problems in Ethiopian lowland and highland areas respectively. Failure of antimonial drugs to respond in some diffused cutaneous leishmaniasis and HIV/AIDS-leishmaniasis co-infected patients, side effects of these drugs, highly mutilating diagnostic procedures and high health care expense are among the problems associated with leishmaniasis. Control of leishmaniasis requires proper understanding of human parasites transmissions (anthroponotic or zoonotic or both). The aim of this review was to elaborate different ecologies of leishmaniasis based on evidences from previous researches and information from literatures obtained from different sources including PubMed to describe zoonotic leishmaniasis in Ethiopia with possible control methods. Although vectors of leishmaniasis in Ethiopia are not endophelic, night indoor visits of Phlebotomus vectors for possible blood meal on human have been indicated. Thus, application of indoor and domestic residual insecticides spraying, use of insecticide impregnated fine mashed bed net for visceral leishmaniasis, community based manipulation (destruction) and residual insecticide fogging of hyrax-sand fly habitats for cutaneous leishmaniasis are the visible vector and reservoir control methods that can be used for control of these diseases in Ethiopia. Use of repellants during night outdoor activities of people in the endemic areas requires further investigations.


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